Posts Tagged With: wetlands

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Eastern Bluebird)


This picture take 2017 at Cooper Marsh.

Categories: Marshes, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Baltimore Oriole)


This Baltimore Oriole’s picture was taken in Cooper Marsh

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Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Chipmunk)


This chipmunk was so cute. Hopping around gathering food and nest building stuff, before disappearing into a hole in the walking path.  Taken at Cooper’s Marsh.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Snapping Turtle) Just Below The Surface Of The Water


002 Ile Bizard 2015 09 16

 

This large Snapping Turtle’s picture was taken in September of this year at Ile Bizard’s Nature Park.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Birds In Winter Settings) / Park Of Rapids


Winter is ending in the Park of Rapids. Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Winter is ending in the Park of Rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Canada Geese looking for something to eat under the snow. Park of Rapids, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Canada Geese looking for something to eat under the snow.
Park of Rapids, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Early arrivals to park of rapids. Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Early arrivals to park of rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Family of Geese taking a walk in the snow in Park of rapids. Montrea, Quebec, Canada.

Family of Geese taking a walk in the snow in Park of rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The pictures were taken by me in the Park of Rapids as winter was coming to an end, proving to me that there is always something to see in nature no matter the season.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

Categories: Cities and Towns, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized, Winter Activity | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The American Wigeon)


The American wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The American Wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.[

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of  green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

These pictures of the American Wigeon were taken by me on a visit to The Park of Rapids in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and the information about the American Wigeon was taken from Wikipedia.

The American wigeon (Anas americana), also American widgeon or baldpate, is a species of dabbling duck found in North America. It is common and widespread, breeding in all but the extreme north of Canada and Alaska.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Cities and Towns, Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The Belted Kingfisher)


The Belted Kingfisher is a stocky, medium-sized bird. The Belted Kingfisher has a large head with a shaggy crest. Its long, heavy bill is black with a grey base. The female is more brightly colored than the male. Both sexes have a slate blue head, large white collar, a large blue band on the breast, and white underparts. The back and wings are slate blue with black feather tips with little white dots. The female features a rufous band across the upper belly that extends down the flanks.

The Belted Kingfisher is a stocky, medium-sized bird. The Belted Kingfisher has a large head with a shaggy crest. Its long, heavy bill is black with a grey base. The female is more brightly colored than the male. Both sexes have a slate blue head, large white-collar, a large blue band on the breast, and white under parts. The back and wings are slate blue with black feather tips with little white dots. The female features a rufous band across the upper belly that extends down the flanks.

The Belted Kingfisher breeding habitat is near inland bodies of waters or coasts across most of Canada, Alaska and the United States. It leaves northern parts of its range when the water freezes; in warmer areas it is a permanent resident. A few individuals may linger in the north even in the coldest winters except in the Arctic, if there are remaining open bodies of water.

The Belted Kingfisher breeding habitat is near inland bodies of waters or coasts across most of Canada, Alaska and the United States. It leaves northern parts of its range when the water freezes; in warmer areas it is a permanent resident. A few individuals may linger in the north even in the coldest winters except in the Arctic, if there are remaining open bodies of water.

The Belted Kingfisher is often seen perched prominently on trees, posts, or other suitable "watch points" close to water before plunging in head first after its fish prey. They also eat amphibians, small crustaceans, insects, small mammals and reptiles.

The Belted Kingfisher is often seen perched prominently on trees, posts, or other suitable “watch points” close to water before plunging in head first after its fish prey. They also eat amphibians, small crustaceans, insects, small mammals and reptiles.

The Belted Kingfisher nests in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank or sand bank and excavated by both parents. The female lays five to eight eggs and both adults incubate the eggs and feed the young. The nest of the belted kingfisher is a long tunnel and often slopes uphill. One possible reason for the uphill slope is in the case of flooding the chicks will be able to survive in the air pocket formed by the elevated end of the tunnel.

The Belted Kingfisher nests in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank or sand bank and excavated by both parents. The female lays five to eight eggs and both adults incubate the eggs and feed the young.
The nest of the belted kingfisher is a long tunnel and often slopes uphill. One possible reason for the uphill slope is in the case of flooding the chicks will be able to survive in the air pocket formed by the elevated end of the tunnel.

Credits Belted Kingfisher The belted Kingfisher is  a is a large, conspicuous water Kingfisher and the only member of that group commonly found in the northern United States and Canada. It is depicted on the 1986 series Canadian $5 note.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The Red-winged Blackbird)


The male adult Red-winged Blackbird has scarlet-and-yellow shoulder patches they can puff up or hide depending on how confident they feel.  The red-winged blackbird inhabits open grassy areas. It prefers wetlands, and inhabits both freshwater and saltwater marshes, particularly if cattail is present. It is also found in dry upland areas, where it inhabits meadows, prairies, and old fields

The male adult Red-winged Blackbird has scarlet-and-yellow shoulder patches they can puff up or hide depending on how confident they feel.
The red-winged blackbird inhabits open grassy areas. It prefers wetlands, and inhabits both freshwater and saltwater marshes, particularly if cattail is present. It is also found in dry upland areas, where it inhabits meadows, prairies, and old fields.

 

 

The female adult Red-winged Blackbird is  brown and streaky overall, has thick dark streaks on breast, a buff, or orangish throat and a sharply pointed conical bill. The red-winged blackbird feeds primarily on plant materials, but about a quarter of its diet consists of insects and other small animals.

The female adult Red-winged Blackbird is brown and streaky overall, has thick dark streaks on breast, a buff, or orangish throat and a sharply pointed conical bill.
The red-winged blackbird feeds primarily on plant materials, but about a quarter of its diet consists of insects and other small animals.

 

The immature Red-winged Blackbird is black overall with buff or orange edges to feathers has yellow on shoulder, may show some red and has a Conical, pointed bill. The red-winged blackbird nests in loose colonies. The nest is built in cattails, rushes, grasses, sedge, or in alder or willow bushes

The immature Red-winged Blackbird is black overall with buff or orange edges to feathers has yellow on shoulder, may show some red and has a Conical, pointed bill.
The red-winged blackbird nests in loose colonies. The nest is built in cattails, rushes, grasses, sedge, or in alder or willow bushes

 

This bird is pretending to be injured trying to lead me away from the nest. The red-winged blackbird aggressively defends its territory from other animals. It will attack much larger birds.[21] Males have been known to swoop at humans who encroach upon their nesting territory during breeding season.

This bird is pretending to be injured trying to lead me away from the nest.
The red-winged blackbird aggressively defends its territory from other animals. It will attack much larger birds.[21] Males have been known to swoop at humans who encroach upon their nesting territory during breeding season.

The Red-winged Blackbird is a familiar sight atop cattails, along soggy roadsides, and on telephone wires.

The Red-winged Blackbird is a familiar sight atop cattails, along soggy roadsides, and on telephone wires.

Credits c

 

The Red-winged Blackbird is one of the most widely distributed, abundant, well-known, and well-named birds in North America.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

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Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Adolescent Blue Jays of Cooper Marsh)


Adolescent Blue Jay  Cooper Marsh

Identification: Upper parts blue with distinct crest and white bars across the wing. Long, black barred tail, tipped white; under parts grey with prominent dark chin strap.

Adolescent Blue Jay  Cooper Marsh

Voice: Loud jay-jay \ Habitat: Parks, gardens, forests.

Adolescent Blue Jay  Cooper Marsh

Range: Eastern US and eastern and southern Canada.

Adolescent Blue Jay  Cooper Marsh

Diet: The bulk of the jay’s diet consists of fruits, nuts, grains and insects, but it is also known to feed on the eggs and young of other bids.

Adolescent Blue Jay  Cooper Marsh

Interesting Fact: Blue Jay’s feathers are not actually blue. The bright cobalt colour is the result of the unique inner structure of the feathers, which distort the reflection of light off the bird, making it look blue.

Credits

 

The Blue Jay is a white-faced bird with a distinctive blue crest, back, wings and tail. A collar of black is often found around the throat and head, and bills, legs, feet and eyes are also black. The Blue Jay has a very heavy bill which is used to peck open a variety of nuts, acorns and cocoons.  

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, National Parks, Nature Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The World Just Below The Surface Water Of Your Pond, Or Marsh #1)


Things you could see in the world  just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh.

Things you could see in the world just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh, like the beautiful designs and colors, shapes and creatures seen in this picture.

Things you could see in the world  just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh.

Things you could see in the world just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh, like a field of underwater water plants and grasses that shelter and feed the inhabitants of that world.

Things you could see in the world  just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh.

Things you could see in the world just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh like two snails on a log.

Things you could see in the world  just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh.

Things you could see in the world just below the surface of the water in your pond, or marsh, like a pollywog.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

Categories: Marshes, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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