Posts Tagged With: nature

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Eastern Bluebird)


This picture take 2017 at Cooper Marsh.

Advertisements
Categories: Marshes, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Baltimore Oriole)


This Baltimore Oriole’s picture was taken in Cooper Marsh

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, National Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Chipmunk)


This chipmunk was so cute. Hopping around gathering food and nest building stuff, before disappearing into a hole in the walking path.  Taken at Cooper’s Marsh.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeas’s Favorite Nature Pictures


090 Gound Hog

 

Going through some pictures taken in 2014 while visiting the Park of Rapids in Quebec, Canada, I came across this cute of a groundhog sunning itself on the wall of an overpass and could not resist sharing.

Categories: Marshes, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Peacefully Sharing Space)


 

2013-08-07 Park Of Rapids Bird Sanctuary Montreal, Quebec, Canada

2013-08-07 Park Of Rapids Bird Sanctuary
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

 

2012-05-03 Cooper Marsh Ontario, Canada

2012-05-03 Cooper Marsh
Ontario, Canada

 

2012-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary Montreal, Quebec, Canada

2012-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

2013-09-30 Nuns Island bird Sanctuary Nuns Island, Quebec, Canada

2013-09-30 Nuns Island bird Sanctuary
Nuns Island, Quebec,
Canada

2015-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary Montreal, Quebec, Canada

2015-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

2015-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary Montreal, Quebec, Canada

2015-05-23 Park of Rapids Bird Sanctuary
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Birds In Winter Settings)My Backyard


Snowy Owl force down on roof by Black Birds

Snowy Owl forced down on roof by Black Birds

Hawk having lunch in backyard.

Hawk having lunch in backyard.

This Snowy Owl was kept on the roof by these Black Birds for almost 8 minutes.

This Snowy Owl was kept on the roof by these Black Birds for almost 8 minutes.

Hawk protecting its meal

Hawk protecting its meal

Snowy Owl

Snowy Owl

Big hawk in the snow

Big hawk in the snow

 

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

Categories: Cities and Towns, Winter Activity | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Birds In Winter Settings) / Park Of Rapids


Winter is ending in the Park of Rapids. Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Winter is ending in the Park of Rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Canada Geese looking for something to eat under the snow. Park of Rapids, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Canada Geese looking for something to eat under the snow.
Park of Rapids, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Early arrivals to park of rapids. Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Early arrivals to park of rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Family of Geese taking a walk in the snow in Park of rapids. Montrea, Quebec, Canada.

Family of Geese taking a walk in the snow in Park of rapids.
Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The pictures were taken by me in the Park of Rapids as winter was coming to an end, proving to me that there is always something to see in nature no matter the season.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

Categories: Cities and Towns, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized, Winter Activity | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The American Wigeon)


The American wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The American Wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.[

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of  green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

These pictures of the American Wigeon were taken by me on a visit to The Park of Rapids in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and the information about the American Wigeon was taken from Wikipedia.

The American wigeon (Anas americana), also American widgeon or baldpate, is a species of dabbling duck found in North America. It is common and widespread, breeding in all but the extreme north of Canada and Alaska.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Cities and Towns, Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The Mourning Dove)


Mourning Doves often match their open-country surroundings. They’re delicate brown to buffy-tan overall, with black spots on the wings and black-bordered white tips to the tail feathers.

Mourning Doves often match their open-country surroundings. They’re delicate brown to buffy-tan overall, with black spots on the wings and black-bordered white tips to the tail feathers.

 

 

Mourning Doves fly fast on powerful wing beats, sometimes making sudden ascents, descents, and dodges, their pointed tails stretching behind them.

Mourning Doves fly fast on powerful wing beats, sometimes making sudden ascents, descents, and dodges, their pointed tails stretching behind them.

 

Mourning Doves Mourning Doves can be seen nearly anywhere except the deep woods. Look for them in fields or patches of bare ground, or on overhead perches like telephone wires.

Mourning Doves Mourning Doves can be seen nearly anywhere except the deep woods. Look for them in fields or patches of bare ground, or on overhead perches like telephone wires.

Mourning doves show a preference for the seeds of certain species of plant over others. Foods taken in preference to others include pine nuts, sweetgum seeds, and the seeds of pokeberry, amaranth, canary grass, corn, sesame, and wheat. When their favorite foods are absent, mourning doves will eat the seeds of other plants, including buckwheat, rye, goose grasses and smartweed.

Mourning doves show a preference for the seeds of certain species of plant over others. Foods taken in preference to others include pine nuts, sweetgum seeds, and the seeds of pokeberry, amaranth, canary grass, corn, sesame, and wheat. When their favorite foods are absent, mourning doves will eat the seeds of other plants, including buckwheat, rye, goose grasses and smartweed.

Most mourning doves migrate along flyways over land. Fall migration south runs from September to November, with immature birds moving first, followed by adult females and then by adult males. Migration is usually during the day, in flocks, and at low altitudes. However, not all individuals migrate. Even in Canada some mourning doves remain through winter, sustained by the presence of bird feeders.

Most mourning doves migrate along flyways over land. Fall migration south runs from September to November, with immature birds moving first, followed by adult females and then by adult males. Migration is usually during the day, in flocks, and at low altitudes. However, not all individuals migrate. Even in Canada some mourning doves remain through winter, sustained by the presence of bird feeders.

Credits for Mourning Dove

The mourning dove is a member of the dove family. The bird is also called the turtle-dove or the American mourning dove or rain dove, and formerly was known as the Carolina pigeon or Carolina turtle-dove.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Municipal and Regional Parks, National Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Chipmunks)


 

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

 

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, National Parks, Nature Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.