Posts Tagged With: Bois-de-l’Île-Bizard Nature Park

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Baltimore Oriole)


This Baltimore Oriole’s picture was taken in Cooper Marsh

Advertisements
Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, National Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Chipmunk)


This chipmunk was so cute. Hopping around gathering food and nest building stuff, before disappearing into a hole in the walking path.  Taken at Cooper’s Marsh.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemeda’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Snapping Turtle) Just Below The Surface Of The Water


002 Ile Bizard 2015 09 16

 

This large Snapping Turtle’s picture was taken in September of this year at Ile Bizard’s Nature Park.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favourite Nature Pictures (The World Just Below The Surface Water Of Your Pond, Or Marsh #3)


I was really amazed that these pictures turned out as clearly as they did. They were taken from a boardwalk not under water, with an ordinary camera and lens.

The Longnose Gar is Quebec's only gar species. It is a long, cylindrical, predatory fish, easily recognized by its long, narrow snout. This gar is a primitive fish that is armored with large ganoid scales.

The Longnose Gar is Quebec’s only gar species. It is a long, cylindrical, predatory fish, easily recognized by its long, narrow snout.
This gar is a primitive fish that is armored with large ganoid scales.

 

This species can gulp air at the surface enabling it to survive in poor quality habitats such as stagnant ponds and canals that are characterized by low oxygen conditions

This species can gulp air at the surface enabling it to survive in poor quality habitats such as stagnant ponds and canals that are characterized by low oxygen conditions

 

Distribution of the Longnose Gar in Quebec:

Distribution of the Longnose Gar in Quebec:

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there and have a great summer!

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (Great Blue Heron On A Frozen Pond)


As I and the creatures that inhabit Quebec’s  marshes, bird sanctuaries, bogs and parks wait for spring to take a firm hold I decided to take a visit Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary just to get some fresh air. It was while on this walk that I was reminded how beautiful, resourceful and resilient  the wild creatures of the  world are.

Nun's Island Bird Sanctuary Nun's Island, Quebec, Canada April, 05, 2005

Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary
Nun’s Island, Quebec, Canada
April, 05, 2005

Whether we are students of  nature, practitioners of conservation, or environmental activists; whether we are natural resource developers, holders of oil leases, mining rights, or intending to drill for oil and gas, should not a Great Blue Heron  walking on a frozen,  snow-covered pond in marsh awaken something in us?

Nun's Island Bird Sanctuary Nun's Island, Quebec, Canada April, 05, 2005

Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary
Nun’s Island, Quebec, Canada
April, 05, 2005

It is at  times like this when I get to look upon a Great Blue Heron affording me such an uncharacteristic picture that I truly understand how little we know about nature, its many secrets, hidden treasures and wonders yet to behold.

 

Nun's Island Bird Sanctuary Nun's Island, Quebec, Canada April, 05, 2005

Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary
Nun’s Island, Quebec, Canada
April, 05, 2005

It is the fascination of ordinary folk like you and me when we witness things such as   a Great Blue Heron hunting on a frozen pond that keeps the need to have the desire to have this type of beauty and awe survive the march of progress. The questions that are raised because of it are important, because it is times like this that force us to go in search of answers about things we were so convinced that we already knew the answer to, like ‘How did the Heron learn to ice fish?’

Nun's Island Bird Sanctuary Nun's Island, Quebec, Canada April, 05, 2005

Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary
Nun’s Island, Quebec, Canada
April, 05, 2005

Wanting to know how the fish got to be in that Great Blue Herons mouth, why the Red Tailed Hawk a migratory bird is seen wintering a lot in the province of Quebec and how they both are managing to stay alive, are questions that I hope that my grandchildren will be forced to ask, because they like me were able to go to a place like the Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary and are lucky enough to see the Great Blue Heron ice fishing on a frozen pond.

Nun's Island Bird Sanctuary Nun's Island, Quebec, Canada April, 05, 2005

Nun’s Island Bird Sanctuary
Nun’s Island, Quebec, Canada
April, 05, 2005

As I turned to go I felt blessed and knew that there is nothing more humbling, thought-provoking and more beautiful, than nature itself, and everything that comes with it. From the tiniest of insects to the largest of mammals.  Everything is as much a part of  nature as we are and as important to our existence as we are to its.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Uncategorized, Winter Pictures | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The Yellow Warbler)


Yellow Warbler Park of Rapids Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Yellow Warbler, 2012
Park of Rapids
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Yellow Warbler  Park of Rapids Montreal Quebec Canada

Yellow Warbler, 2014
Park of Rapids
Montreal Quebec Canada

 

Yellow Warbler  Park of Rapids, 2014  Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Yellow Warbler
Park of Rapids, 2014
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Yellow Warbler  Marcil Laurin  Wooded Park Ville Saint Laurent, Quebec Canada Quebec

Yellow Warbler, 2012
Marcil Laurin Woodland Park
Ville Saint Laurent, Quebec, Canada

 

Yellow Warbler, 2012 Marcil Laurin Woodland Park Saint Laurent, Quebec, Canada

Yellow Warbler, 2012
Marcil Laurin Woodland Park
Saint Laurent, Quebec, Canada

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Winter Pictures (Northern Cardinal Of Cooper Marsh)


The northern cardinal is a North American bird. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States. and  It is found in woodlands, gardens, shrub lands, and swamps.  Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

The northern cardinal is a North American bird. It can be found in southern Canada, through the eastern United States.      The northern cardinal is found in woodlands, gardens, shrub lands, and swamps.
Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014
in Ontario, Canada

 

The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). The male is a vibrant red, has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black. Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). The male is a vibrant red, has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black.
Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

The female is a dull red-brown shade, has distinctive crest on the head. The female’s mask is gray. Picture taken in park Bovin, on December 29, 2014

The female is a dull red-brown shade, has distinctive crest on the head. The female’s mask is gray.
Picture taken in park Bovin, on December 29, 2014

During the summer months, it shows preference for seeds that are easily husked, but is less selective during winter, when food is scarce. Northern cardinals will also consume insects and feed their young almost exclusively on insects Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

During the summer months, it shows preference for seeds that are easily husked, but is less selective during winter, when food is scarce. Northern cardinals will also consume insects and feed their young almost exclusively on insects
Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

It is believed that Northern Cardinals mate for life, but during winter, the male does not allow his mate to feed with him. With the return of spring we see the practice of mate-feeding when the male brings shucked sunflower seeds and other choice tidbits to the female and places them in her open mouth. Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

It is believed that Northern Cardinals mate for life, but during winter, the male does not allow his mate to feed with him. With the return of spring we see the practice of mate-feeding when the male brings shucked sunflower seeds and other choice tidbits to the female and places them in her open mouth.
Picture taken in Cooper Marsh, on December 14, 2014 in Ontario, Canada

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks, Uncategorized, Winter Pictures | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Pictures (Winter Almost Done In The Park Of Rapids)


 

The Saint Lawrence River is never totally frozen, although where the water runs the slowest it does freeze enough for ice to form ice masses that extend from the shore a short distance into the river, strong enough to ice fish on.

The Saint Lawrence River is never totally frozen, although where the water runs the slowest it does freeze enough for ice to form ice masses that extend from the shore a short distance into the river, strong enough to ice fish on.

As you can see where the water runs fast and furious no ice masses will form and winter does little to low this might river down.

As you can see where the water runs fast and furious no ice masses will form and winter does little to low this might river down.

As winter draws to an end in the Park of Rapids, animals such as the mink become more active and if one is lucky the opportunity for a picture may present itself.

As winter draws to an end in the Park of Rapids, animals such as the mink become more active and if one is lucky the opportunity for a picture may present itself.

Ducks are often return before the winter is over in the Park of Rapids.

Ducks  often return before the winter is over in the Park of Rapids.

 

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

Categories: Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The American Wigeon)


The American wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The American Wigeon is a medium-sized bird; it is larger than a teal, but smaller than a pintail. In silhouette, the wigeon can be distinguished from other dabblers by its round head, short neck, and small bill.

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.[

The hens have gray and brown plumage. Both sexes have a pale blue bill with a black tip, a white belly, and gray legs and feet.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of  green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The breeding male (drake) has a mask of green feathers around its eyes and a cream colored cap running from the crown of its head to its bill. This white patch gives the wigeon its other common name, baldpate. Their belly is also white.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

The American wigeon is a bird of open wetlands, such as wet grassland or marshes with some taller vegetation, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

Wigeon also commonly feed on dry land, eating waste grain in harvested fields and grazing on pasture grasses, winter wheat, clover, and lettuce. Having a largely vegetarian diet, most wigeon migrate in the fall well before northern marshes begin to freeze.

These pictures of the American Wigeon were taken by me on a visit to The Park of Rapids in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and the information about the American Wigeon was taken from Wikipedia.

The American wigeon (Anas americana), also American widgeon or baldpate, is a species of dabbling duck found in North America. It is common and widespread, breeding in all but the extreme north of Canada and Alaska.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Cities and Towns, Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Regional Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Archemedas’s Favorite Nature Pictures (The Belted Kingfisher)


The Belted Kingfisher is a stocky, medium-sized bird. The Belted Kingfisher has a large head with a shaggy crest. Its long, heavy bill is black with a grey base. The female is more brightly colored than the male. Both sexes have a slate blue head, large white collar, a large blue band on the breast, and white underparts. The back and wings are slate blue with black feather tips with little white dots. The female features a rufous band across the upper belly that extends down the flanks.

The Belted Kingfisher is a stocky, medium-sized bird. The Belted Kingfisher has a large head with a shaggy crest. Its long, heavy bill is black with a grey base. The female is more brightly colored than the male. Both sexes have a slate blue head, large white-collar, a large blue band on the breast, and white under parts. The back and wings are slate blue with black feather tips with little white dots. The female features a rufous band across the upper belly that extends down the flanks.

The Belted Kingfisher breeding habitat is near inland bodies of waters or coasts across most of Canada, Alaska and the United States. It leaves northern parts of its range when the water freezes; in warmer areas it is a permanent resident. A few individuals may linger in the north even in the coldest winters except in the Arctic, if there are remaining open bodies of water.

The Belted Kingfisher breeding habitat is near inland bodies of waters or coasts across most of Canada, Alaska and the United States. It leaves northern parts of its range when the water freezes; in warmer areas it is a permanent resident. A few individuals may linger in the north even in the coldest winters except in the Arctic, if there are remaining open bodies of water.

The Belted Kingfisher is often seen perched prominently on trees, posts, or other suitable "watch points" close to water before plunging in head first after its fish prey. They also eat amphibians, small crustaceans, insects, small mammals and reptiles.

The Belted Kingfisher is often seen perched prominently on trees, posts, or other suitable “watch points” close to water before plunging in head first after its fish prey. They also eat amphibians, small crustaceans, insects, small mammals and reptiles.

The Belted Kingfisher nests in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank or sand bank and excavated by both parents. The female lays five to eight eggs and both adults incubate the eggs and feed the young. The nest of the belted kingfisher is a long tunnel and often slopes uphill. One possible reason for the uphill slope is in the case of flooding the chicks will be able to survive in the air pocket formed by the elevated end of the tunnel.

The Belted Kingfisher nests in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank or sand bank and excavated by both parents. The female lays five to eight eggs and both adults incubate the eggs and feed the young.
The nest of the belted kingfisher is a long tunnel and often slopes uphill. One possible reason for the uphill slope is in the case of flooding the chicks will be able to survive in the air pocket formed by the elevated end of the tunnel.

Credits Belted Kingfisher The belted Kingfisher is  a is a large, conspicuous water Kingfisher and the only member of that group commonly found in the northern United States and Canada. It is depicted on the 1986 series Canadian $5 note.

Note:

I can now be found by searching for Arche Medas – google+ and for myspiritsview.blogspot.com.  By going to either site you will be able to view:

  • Pictures and newly introduced video clips of nature as seen through my cameras lens.
  • Pictures of both the famous and not so famous historical buildings and structures found in Quebec and Southern Ontario both famous and the not so famous.

Hope to see you there.

Categories: Marshes, Municipal and Regional Parks, Nature Parks, Regional Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.